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Talk by Jerome Rothenberg

Poet Jerome Rothenberg gives a talk as part of the Poem Present Series. Jerome’s career has already spanned half a century, including seventy books of his own poetry, plus plays, acclaimed anthologies, and other works. Rothenberg has explored primitive and archaic poetry, sound poetry, found poetry, visual poetry, collaborations, further translations, his own Jewish heritage, and much more.

Date: 
Friday, April 11, 2014
Presented By: 
Poem Present and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Reading by Jerome Rothenberg

Poet Jerome Rothenberg reads a selection of his work including a new commission for the Reva Logan Poetry Series. Jerome’s career has already spanned half a century, including seventy books of his own poetry, plus plays, acclaimed anthologies, and other works. Rothenberg has explored primitive and archaic poetry, sound poetry, found poetry, visual poetry, collaborations, further translations, his own Jewish heritage, and much more.

Date: 
Thursday, April 10, 2014
Presented By: 
The Logan Center and the Program on Poetry and Poetics. The Reva Logan Poetry Series is made possible by the generous support of the Reva and David Logan Foundation.

Lecture by David Nowell-Smith, “A Natural Scale”

In his Treatise on the Origin of Language (1771), Herder employs two striking tropes to describe the sonority of language: the animal ‘language of sensation’ is described as issuing from the ‘finest instrument strings of animal feeling’, whereas a poetic vocal repertoire that comprises onomatopoeia but also oratory and prosody is grounded in ‘the natural scale of the human voice’. Herder’s distinction pits against each other two competing conceptions of language (as expression and as reference), but also two conceptions of music (as timbre and as diatonic harmony) that were contested throughout eighteenth century musical theory. This paper takes Herder’s distinction as a starting point for a reflection on the anomalies of voice for poetics more broadly, both within other accounts of vocal ‘origins’ to language (psychoanalytic accounts such as Abrahams and Torok, ontological accounts such as Agamben’s ), and within poetic treatments of glossolalia and onomatopoeia, drawing on figures as diverse as Gerard Manley Hopkins, Antonin Artaud, and the mysterious 16th century French sound poet Durand de la Malle.

Date: 
Wednesday, April 2, 2014
Presented By: 
The History and Forms of Lyric Lecture Series and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Reading by William Fuller

William Fuller received his Ph.D from the University of Virginia in 1983; he has worked for many years as a trust officer in Chicago. Among his books are The Sugar Borders, Aether; Sadly, and Watchword. His latest, Quorum, is a collection of vivid detours and deadpan visions arranged into forty-five sonnet-like poems.

Date: 
Thursday, February 13, 2014
Presented By: 
The Ron Offen Poetry Awards and the Program in Poetry & Poetics

"Lines of Sight: The Poetry of Vision" A Talk by Rosanna Warren

Rosanna Warren is the Hanna Holborn Gray Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Warren's most recent books of poems are Departure and Ghost in a Red Hat. She is the recipient of awards from the Academy of American Poets, The American Academy of Arts & Letters, the Lila Wallace Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the New England Poetry Club, among others. She was a Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets from 1999 to 2005, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Date: 
Friday, January 24, 2014
Presented By: 
Poem Present and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Reva Logan Poetry Series: A Reading by Rosanna Warren

Rosanna Warren award winning poet and new faculty member, will read a selection of her work including a new poem commissioned for the Reva Logan Poetry Series. Her second collection of poetry, Stained Glass, received a Lamont Poetry Selection award from the American Academy of Poets in 1993. Her most recent book of poems is Ghost in a Red Hat, published in 2011. She is also the author of a book of literary criticism, Fables of the Self: Studies in Lyric Poetry, published in 2008. Warren is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has served as chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.

Date: 
Thursday, January 23, 2014
Presented By: 
The Reva and David Logan Center for the Arts and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Henry Weinfield: History & Forms of Lyric Lecture

Henry Weinfield is a poet, translator, and literary scholar. His most recent collections of poetry are A Wandering Aramaean: Passover Poems and Translations (Dos Madres 2012) and Without Mythologies: New and Selected Poems and Translations (Dos Madres 2008). His most recent study is The Blank-Verse Tradition from Milton to Stevens: Freethinking and the Crisis of Modernity (Cambridge 2012). His verse-translations include a version, with commentary, of the Collected Poems of Stephane Mallarme (University of California Press 1995) and (with Catherine Schlegel of Notre Dame's Classics Department) a translation of Hesiod's Theogony and Works and Days (University of Michigan Press 2006). He is also the author of The Music of Thought in the Poetry of George Oppen and William Bronk (University of Iowa Press 2009), The Poet without a Name: Gray's Elegy and the Problem of History (Southern Illinois University Press 1991), and many poems, essays, and articles.

Date: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
Presented By: 
The History and Forms of Lyric Lecture Series and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Lecture by Fanny Howe

Fanny Howe is the author of more than 40 books of poetry and prose, most recently Come and See (2011), The Lyrics (2007), Radical Love (2006), On the Ground (2004), Gone (2003), and Economics (2002). Her Selected Poems was awarded the 2001 Lenore Marshall Poetry Prize. Howe has also received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Poetry Foundation, the California Arts Council, and The Village Voice, as well as fellowships from the Bunting Institute and the MacDowell Colony.

Date: 
Friday, November 22, 2013
Presented By: 
Poem Present

Reading by Fanny Howe

Fanny Howe is the author of more than 40 books of poetry and prose, most recently Come and See. In 2009, Howe was awarded the Ruth Lilley Poetry Prize, presented each year by the Poetry Foundation to a living U.S. poet deserving of extraordinary recognition for a lifetime of literary work. Howe read a selection of her work—including a new poem comissioned for the Reva Logan Poetry Series.

Date: 
Thursday, November 21, 2013
Presented By: 
The Reva Logan Poetry Series and the Program in Poetry and Poetics

Reading by Keston Sutherland

Keston Sutherland is the author of Stupefaction: a radical anatomy of phantoms, and most recently, The Odes to TL61P. His work first reached American audiences with the publication of the poem “Hot White Andy” in a special issue of the Chicago Review, showcasing four young British poets. A Professor of Poetics at the University of Sussex, Sutherland visited the University of Chicago while a Holloway Poetry Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. 

Date: 
Friday, November 15, 2013
Presented By: 
The Emerging Writers Series and the Program in Poetry & Poetics

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